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  1. 1. What are the benefits of using a water to air intercooler as opposed to a front mount intercooler?
  2. 2. I thought blow off valves don't work on engines with a MAF air metering sensor?
  3. 3. What is the difference between HP, BHP, and WHP?
  4. 4. How much horsepower can the stock engine handle?
  5. 5. How much horsepower can the stock 2.0l engine with the 1.8l piston and rod set installed handle?
  6. 6. Why would 1.8l pistons/rods fit in my 2.0l engine?
  7. 7. Why does Jattus use the Mitsubishi platform for turbos instead of Garret turbos?
  8. 8. How much will my fuel mileage/economy decrease with a turbo?
  9. 9. What gauges should I install to go along with my turbo kit?
  10. 10. What size/type of exhaust system should I go with for my turbocharged engine?
  11. 11. Are there any performance benefits from powder coating?
  12. 12. Do I need to buy a boost controller for my turbo kit?
  13. 13. Is a blow off valve required for a turbo system?
  14. 14. Is an intercooler required for a turbo system?
  15. 15. Why at the same psi boost levels, do some turbo setups on our 2.0l hyundai engine produce over 400hp, and other only 200hp?
  16. 16. Do I need to recirculate my blow off valve?
  17. 17. Do I need an oil catch can?
  18. 18. Do I want to be using low impedience or high impedience injectors? What is the difference?
  19. 19. You don't have the powder coating color that I want listed.
  20. 20. Do I need an ECU reflash after I purchase a Jattus turbo kit?

  1. 1
    What are the benefits of using a water to air intercooler as opposed to a front mount intercooler?

    There are several benefits to using a water to air intercooler over a front mount, or air to air intercooler. First, as the turbocharger begins to spool, there is a lot less volume of air that needs to be compressed in the charge pipes before actual boost is made, thus a water to air intercooler system will spool up the turbo much faster, and takes up less room. Second, water to air intercoolers work at a higher efficency range; heat is transfered out of water much easier than it is transfered to air, meaning more engine cooling, and more power to be made. You can also for example add ice to the water reservoir, which temporarily cools the air going into the engine drastically and increasing horsepower (great for at the track). The pressure drop through a water intercooler is generally around 20 times less than that of an air to air intercooler. Water to air intercooling is the latest in technology and even the Bugatti Veyron uses one for there 1001hp production car!

  2. 2
    I thought blow off valves don't work on engines with a MAF air metering sensor?

    They certainly can work on a MAF or MAP based car. Normally on a MAF based engines, you need to recirculate the blow off valve vent back into the intake of the turbo to prevent blowing out "metered air" and having the engine run temporarily rich for a second. With the Jattus Performance turbo kits, the MAF sensor is placed in the charge pipes, completely illiminating the need to do that, and keeps the blow off valve nice and loud.

  3. 3
    What is the difference between HP, BHP, and WHP?

    The power an engine produces directly at the crankshaft is refered to horsepower (HP) or break horsepower (BHP). The power that actually gets to the ground is refered to wheel horsepower (WHP). In a front wheel drive car, generally there is a 15% power loss through the drivetrain (meaning that when you buy a car from the dealership it says 138hp or 138bhp, but if you were to actually dyno the car which measures it at the wheels, you will get something more along the lines of 120whp (which is a 15% decrease in power). Most all-wheel drive cars experience even worse, as its closer to 20-25% power loss through the drivetrain down to the tires. It goes the same both ways though, if your car dynos at 240whp, that will be the same as the engine producing 276hp at the crankshaft.

  4. 4
    How much horsepower can the stock engine handle?

    This depends a lot on how well the fuel and engine timing is tuned, but generally you can get in the 300's whp on the stock engine.

  5. 5
    How much horsepower can the stock 2.0l engine with the 1.8l piston and rod set installed handle?

    This depends a lot on how well the fuel and engine timing is tuned, but there have been plenty of people well over 400whp on there daily driven vehicles using these pistons/rods set.

  6. 6
    Why would 1.8l pistons/rods fit in my 2.0l engine?

    The 1.8l and the 2.0l engines both have the same bore diameter in the block. The 1.8l engine uses a crankshaft with a shorter stroke. Take a look at this formula for example: Engine Displacement = Stroke * 3.1415 * (Bore / 2)^2 * (# of cylinders). Basically you can change the displacement of the engine by just alterating the Stroke alone. Because of this the 1.8l pistons/rods are a bit shorter than the 2.0l ones. So installing these in the 2.0l engine reduces the engine compression, but maintains the same displacement, which is perfect for a turbocharged vehicle.

  7. 7
    Why does Jattus use the Mitsubishi platform for turbos instead of Garret turbos?

    There are several reasons why Jattus Performance does this. First for the same cost, mitsubishi turbos come oil and water cooled, as opposed to garret turbos which are oil cooled only (not talking about the GT series). If you use a oil cooled only turbo, you are required to let the engine idle for several minutes before turning the engine off, everytime. If you have a oil and water cooled turbo you don't have to do that, and is a better system. The other benefit of the mitsubishi turbos is that the "frame" of the turbo is physically smaller than that of a garrett, allowing for a more powerful turbo to fit in a constraining space (and most Hyundai engine bays don't have much room as it is). They also offer a wide variety of turbos for different horsepower goals, and are generally plug and play, so its easy to upgrade.

  8. 8
    How much will my fuel mileage/economy decrease with a turbo?

    Adding a turbocharger to an engine can keep your fuel mileage the same, or even increase it! Generally in most engines, 1/3 of the engines power is used in cooling and self maintaining, 1/3 is actually used, and the last 1/3 is wasted out the exhaust due to being ineficient. A turbocharger is powered off the engines exhaust, getting some of that efficiency back. Yes you will be more tempted to use the turbocharger to its fullest all the time, which in turn will hurt your gas mileage, but not when driving with efficiency in mind.

  9. 9
    What gauges should I install to go along with my turbo kit?

    For any turbo kit, its always a good idea to install a boost gauge and an air/fuel ratio gauge to go along with it. With the boost gauge you can actually see the psi levels that the turbo is creating, and you can adjust accordingly. The air/fuel ratio gauge is important as well, as to make sure your fuel mixture is where it should be at. Generally 14.7/1 (meaning 14.7 air molecules per 1 fuel molecule) is considered stoich and where you want to be at. Under acceleration and full throttle you want your air/fuel ratios to be around 12:1 (so a little more richer in fuel) to stay safe. Running lean (meaning too much air) is extremely hazordous to an engine. A wideband air/fuel ratio gauge is best, especially if it has data logging capabilities as it allows you to tune your fuel maps more easily.

  10. 10
    What size/type of exhaust system should I go with for my turbocharged engine?

    On a turbocharged engine, the less backpressure in the exhaust system the better (unlike a naturally asperated engine, which needs some backpressure to operate properly). The turbocharger in the exhaust provides all of the backpressure needed, and anymore results in a loss of power. Here is a graph that you can use to base the diameter of your exhaust system to go with:

  11. 11
    Are there any performance benefits from powder coating?

    Yes! Not only does powder coating look spectacular in an engine bay, and is extremely hard to scratch or scuff, it adds a protective heat barrier to the air entering the engine. Colder air means more horsepower.

  12. 12
    Do I need to buy a boost controller for my turbo kit?

    No. The turbochargers come with an internal wastegate actuator installed on it which regulates boost pressures. An after market boost controller is used to trick this actuator into opening later then normal, thus increasing boost pressures and increasing power. You can only increase boost pressure with a boost controller, you can't however decrease from its stock setting.

  13. 13
    Is a blow off valve required for a turbo system?

    No. For low boost applications (e.g. 8psi and under) its not necissary to have a blow off valve, though it is recommended. Under boost, when you let off the gas and the throttle plate closes, all of this flowing air suddenly comes to a halt, and is forced backwards, back out the turbocharger which normally creates a fluttering sound. This sound is called compressor surge, and although at low boost pressures it doesn't cause as much damage, it still is bad for a turbo's health and lifespan. Most mitsubishi type turbos are built to be able to handle this low boost without a blow off valve just fine. You will however get more performance with a blow off valve. In between shifts the blow off valve keeps the turbo spinning so it can continue where it left off, as opposed to the turbo being slown down from the surging.

  14. 14
    Is an intercooler required for a turbo system?

    No. For low boost applications you can get away with running charge pipes right out of the turbo up into the throttle body (also gives great throttle responce since there is very little volume of air to fill before boost kicks in). Most people can run up to around 10psi of boost, after that the air begins to get too hot and you run the risk of pre-ignition, at that point you would want to switch over to an intercooler. An intercooler will always add performance to a turbo system though so keep it in mind.

  15. 15
    Why at the same psi boost levels, do some turbo setups on our 2.0l hyundai engine produce over 400hp, and other only 200hp?

    This is true because psi of boost is not directly related to CFM's (air flow rate). For example a td04-15t turbo could be pushing 200CFM's at 15psi of boost, yielding around 240hp, while if you were running something huge like a GT35R you could be pushing over 400CFM's at 15psi of boost, yielding over 400hp. (just estimated values, but hopefully you get the idea). What is the difference though? Turbo lag... The smaller turbo is going to spool up fast and yield the horsepower quickly, while the large turbo is going to take a bit, but at the same psi push a ton more air. The last thing to take into consideration as well is the A/R ratio. Generally speaking, the lower the A/R ratio, the more power you will have in the lower RPM range, and vice versa. This can also play a big role on how much horsepower a turbo is yielding at the same psi levels.

  16. 16
    Do I need to recirculate my blow off valve?

    If you have your MAF sensor in the charge pipes like in the Jattus Performance turbo kits then no its not necissary. If your MAF sensor is on the turbo intake then you should probably recirculate it. If you don't even have a MAF sensor, and have a MAP instead then you don't need to recirculate either.

  17. 17
    Do I need an oil catch can?

    An oil catch can is not required on a turbocharged vehicle. The pistons sitting in the block make a pretty good seal with the piston rings to maintain compression, but they are not perfect. On every combustion stroke, a little bit of the "explosion" passes through the piston rings, and leads back up to the valve cover of the engine. This excess pressure needs to be releived, and normally is done so through the PCV valve. Because of all the oil running through the engine, oil vapors, etc. This vapor is pushed up into the valve cover as well, so when its relieved, oil is going to come out with it. Over time this can end up causing a bit of a mess in the engine bay, and in the intake. Splicing in an oil catch can will help "catch" this oil vapor and store it in the container, so later in time you can easily empty it out without having oil covering your engine bay. As you can see they are handy items to have, but not required.

  18. 18
    Do I want to be using low impedience or high impedience injectors? What is the difference?

    High impedience. You can think of impedience as a form of resistance, or more so of a self inflicting resistance. The main difference between the two is the amount of current to open the injector. High impedance injectors require very little as compared to low impedance injectors (about 4 times less). Because of this you can use a simple switch type of a device to open and shut them, and this compatable with most fuel controllers, as well as the hyundai ECU. Low impedance injectors need special circuitry and a lot more power to operate.

  19. 19
    You don't have the powder coating color that I want listed.

    We have many powder coating finishes available that aren't listed, let me know what you want and I can do it for you no problem (even if its a specalty color/finish).

  20. 20
    Do I need an ECU reflash after I purchase a Jattus turbo kit?

    No. The Jattus turbo kits come with all of the necissary fuel controlling devices, nothing else is needed.

 

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